Saturday, 12 April 2014

Kyle Hopkins 1883 Magazine



Kyle Hopkins is a conceptual led jewellery brand with a dark twist. The London based designer is serious about the craft that he has been honing in on since the age of six. Having left Central Saint Martins during his degree to concentrate on the business side of the brand, 2011 saw the debut of the first collection from Kyle Hopkins at LFW and he has since been on the radar of rising stars to watch. Hopkins’ craft lies strongly within the details of his designs, which are based on real life figurines, from humans and animals to plants – none of which are complete without a story to accompany them. Hand made out of silver and gold, his intricate pieces are redefining what jewellery once used to mean to individuals. Hopkins’ aesthetic of wanting to create story-telling pieces as opposed to commercial based seasonal jewellery, are all part of his unique appeal and ability to construct a narrative as an art form.


What is it that you can see outside of your window right now?
People’s feet mainly as my studio is in a basement, so there aren’t any windows.

You grew up in Seattle and began learning the art of jewellery making from a young age. Can you please us a bit about your background and growing up?
I grew up with jewellery and from about the age of five or six I have been learning the materials and techniques that are necessary for making jewellery. Since then I just haven’t been able to put it down. It’s only really been in the last five years or so that I have been focused on the conceptual side and putting together collections. 

Your collections are always based on a metaphor or analogy, who in your opinion is the Kyle Hopkins wearer?
I think people who wear my jewellery want to be noticed, but don’t want to be noticed for the sake of being noticed. I want my jewellery to act as an extension of the wearer, and speak silently on their behalf. I want people to see my jewellery and relate to it on a level that surpasses what you can pick up anywhere. That ideology means a lot to me and it means a lot to the people that wear my pieces.

What are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I am really busy finishing off a lot of orders. I am also putting some thought into the concepts for the new season. Also I am creating a men’s line of jewellery; so there is lots going on but I am loving it. At the end of the day I am getting to make jewellery so all is well. There have been some hitches and problems, but they are good problems to have.

Leaving Central Saint Martins was big decision to make, do you have any regrets?
If I make mistakes, then they are my mistakes, and I will take the blame, and use the experience to move forward. Or if I succeed then I have succeeded. I am really fortunate to be in a situation where I am doing what I love doing as a career. And what is empowering is that I am responsible for my success and failure, and that is inspiring in itself. So long as I am inspired then I am the master of myself. 

We know that you are a bit of a workaholic, what is your favourite way to spend a Sunday?
I work seven days a week, so on Sundays I will be in the studio at some point. As I keep really strange work hours, maybe I’ll have a slower morning and take the time to have a nice breakfast.

London is not that much different from rainy Seattle, what is your favourite thing about being over the pond?
London is so vibrant and what is great about it is the people. There is always something going on and always something new and unfound to experience. In comparison to the US, there is a history and a culture, which is great to be around.

Finally, what does the future hold for Kyle Hopkins?
I just want to push people’s notions of what jewellery amounts to and what it can be. There is a clear difference between mass-market jewellery and what I want to do. I am part of the consumerist thing but at the same time I am not playing at that level, I’m not competing with the huge names and I don’t want to. I am happy with my concept led ideology.

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